Your ticket must cover your entire journey and all zones you travel in. If you're using pay as you go, you must have enough credit to pay for your entire journey. If you're using a mobile device, it must have enough battery to last your journey.

How much is a penalty fare?

It's £80. This is reduced to £40 if you pay within 21 days.

Fare evasion

Fare evasion is a criminal offence and you may be prosecuted.

If convicted, you will:

  • Get a criminal record
  • Pay a fine of up to £1,000
  • Pay compensation for fares avoided
  • Pay a victim surcharge
  • Pay prosecution costs

We have more Revenue Inspectors across our transport services working to reduce fare evasion.

How to pay or appeal a penalty fare 

Bus, Tube, DLR, London Overground and TfL Rail

Pay

Pay online to the Independent Revenue Collection and Support (IRCAS).

Pay by phone:

Pay by post:

IRCAS
PO Box 212
Petersfield
GU32 9BQ

Appeal

Appeal online within 21 days to the Appeal Service (AS).

Appeal by post:

AS
PO Box 267
Petersfield
GU32 9FH

Appeal by fax: 0844 544 8454

You need to include this information with your appeal:

  • Journey start time and station
  • Daytime telephone number or email address
  • Statement explaining why you couldn't produce a valid ticket for your journey

If your appeal is successful, you won't have to pay a penalty fare.

If your appeal is unsuccessful, you'll be notified and advised what to do next.

Tram

Pay

Pay by phone: 020 8681 8300

Pay by post or in person:

Tram Operations Ltd
Penalty Fare Administration
The Tramlink Shop
5 Suffolk House
George Street
Croydon CR0 1PE

Appeal

Appeal by post, by writing to the above Tram Operations Ltd address within 21 days.

You need to include information with your appeal:

  • Journey start time and station
  • Daytime telephone number or email address
  • Statement explaining why you couldn't produce a valid ticket for your journey

If your appeal is successful, you won't have to pay a penalty fare.

If your appeal is unsuccessful, you'll be notified and advised what to do next.

Get your case reopened

If you've been prosecuted and weren't aware of the proceedings against you, you can make a statutory declaration to get your case reopened in the magistrates' court.